Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie
       
     
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
       
     
Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen
       
     
The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
       
     
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
       
     
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
       
     
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
       
     
Alice In Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll
       
     
The Picture Of Dorian Gray
       
     
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
       
     
Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
       
     
KIM by Rudyard Kipling
       
     
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells
       
     
The Importance Of Being Earnest
       
     
Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie
       
     
Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie

J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan is an unprecedented work, which has influenced many generations since its release.  Peter, a mischievous boy who does not grow old, embarks upon many adventures which culminate into remarkable outcomes.

James Matthew (J.M.) Barrie was a Scottish author.  He was born on May 9, 1860 and died on June 19, 1937.  Although, J. M. Barrie published other works, he is best known for his masterpiece, Peter Pan.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
       
     
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

The timeless tale of Dorothy and her faithful dog companion Toto, who are swept away in a cyclone from their home in Kansas and placed into a magical land.  Accompanied by their new found friends, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion, Dorothy and Toto find themselves in some very precarious situations.

Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856 in Chittenango, New York and died on May 6, 1919 in Hollywood, California.  Known primarily for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum authored over fifty novels, eight short stories and two-hundred poems.  Baum also predicted the use of modern technologies in his writings and anticipated the development of computers, television and mobile phones.

Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen
       
     
Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen

Austen's masterpiece and classic tale of life, love and social mistakes in England, during the eighteenth century.  The story unfolds with the introduction of the Bennet family and their concern for their unwed daughters.  Through the Bennet family's actions, Austen introduces us to Victorian society and the challenges a young unwed women faces within it.  The beautiful and charming characters of Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy reign supreme in this timeless tale of true love.

Jane Austen was an English novelist who was born in Steventon Rectory, Hampshire England on December 16, 1775 and died in Winchester, Hampshire, England on July 18, 1817.  Austen was a fierce commentator and critic of the roles of women in traditional institutions such as marriage and motherhood.  Her interpretation and criticisms of women’s dependence upon society and men have been deeply influential for centuries.  Austen is also know for her other works, which include Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion.

The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
       
     
The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

One of the most complex and darkest novellas of the human condition.  Conrad's masterpiece continues to warn what unchecked power coupled with madness can bring.  A moving exploration of the Congo and colonial Africa, Heart of Darkness has both entertained and enraged many, given its often controversial xenophobic underpinnings.

Jozef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski (Joseph Conrad) was born on December 3, 1857 and died on August 3, 1924.  Many of Conrad’s works involved nautical settings.  He influenced many great authors which included Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
       
     
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

One of the most important books of the Victorian Era.  Stevenson's masterpiece elaborates on the duality of man and the constant struggle between good and evil which wages within.  A timeless classic which is just as pertinent today as it was during the period in which it was written.

Robert Louis Stevenson was a brilliant Scottish author.   He was born on November 13, 1850 and died on December 3, 1894. His other notable works are Treasure Island and Kidnapped.

 

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
       
     
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

Wells' classic tale of time travel was written when Einstein was only 16 years old, and before Einstein's time dilation hypothesis as well as his Theory of General Relativity were being considered mainstream ideas. Wells' unprecedented and forward looking tale of a dystopian future where the dreaded Morlocks feed upon the trusting Eloi, is a frightening preview of what happens when there are class distinctions.

Herbert George (H.G.) Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Kent, United Kingdom and died on August 13, 1946 in Regent’s Park, London.  Often considered the father of science fiction, H.G. Wells is also well known for his other timeless classics:  The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds and The Invisible Man.

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
       
     
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

Detective Sherlock Holmes is called to action again to investigate the mysterious murder of Sir Charles Baskerville.  Assisted by his faithful colleague, Dr. Watson, Sherlock Holmes investigates the unusual circumstances surrounding the death of Sir Baskerville.  Nothing is what it appears to be in this fascinating tale, which ultimately results in an unforgettable climax.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a British author.  He was born in Edinburgh on May 22, 1859 and died on July 7, 1930.  Initially trained as a Physician, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle later became well known for his most revered fictional character, Sherlock Holmes.

Alice In Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll
       
     
Alice In Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll

A delightful story of innocence and wonder.  Alice In Wonderland has delighted generations with its creative and colorful characters.  Join Alice through her journeys in Wonderland.

Lewis Carroll is the pseudonym of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson.  Lewis Carroll was born on January 27, 1832 and died on January 14th, 1898.  The title character Alice was named after Alice Liddell, who inspired Lewis Carroll to write Alice In Wonderland.

The Picture Of Dorian Gray
       
     
The Picture Of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray is one of Wilde's most memorable novels.  Within, we are exposed to Dorian's world of unbounded pleasure and ultimate narcissism which has many unintended consequences.  An epic tale of man's self-absorption and final redemption, Wilde's tale excites and cautions.

Oscar Final O’Flahertie Willis Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin, Ireland and died on November 30, 1900 in Paris, France.  Wilde is considered to be one of the most gifted playwrights and novelists who has existed.  Plagued by extreme wealth and poverty, Wilde embodied the fantastic attributes of some his most colorful and memorable characters.  Wilde is also known for The Picture of Dorian Gray and Salome.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
       
     
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein is a tale of suspense and sorrow.  Shelley's masterpiece introduces the world to Victor Frankenstein's Monster, who yearns for love and acceptance from his creator.  However, in his search for love and empathy, Frankenstein's Monster encounters man's xenophobia and hatred for things that are different, especially from the very scientist who created him.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was a young girl when she wrote Frankenstein.  She was born on August 30, 1797 in London and died on February 1, 1851 in London.  Written because of a bet between her and other notable literary figures, her Frankenstein became to be heralded as one of the most chilling horror stories of all time.

Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
       
     
Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

A delightful children's book filled with wonderfully imaginative and articulate animals.  These delightful tales written by Rudyard Kipling, began as bedtime stories for his young daughter Josephine.  If these stories were not told 'Just So,' then little Josephine would become impatient.  Often considered one of the most revered children's books of all time, Just So Stories describes how certain animals received their most discerning characteristics, mannerisms and physical attributes in a witty and colloquial style.

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay, India during the time of British occupation on December 30, 1865 and died in London, England on January 18, 1936.  His other well-known works include The Jungle Book and Kim.

KIM by Rudyard Kipling
       
     
KIM by Rudyard Kipling

A timeless classic of a young orphaned Irish boy, living a tenuous and exciting existence in India during the British occupation in the late 1800's.  Kipling's story is magnificent in scope, with its visually stunning portrayal of India's culture, landscape and people.  We learn much of Kimball (Kim) O'Hara during the course of the story as he traverses the colorful Indian landscape on many adventures.

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay, India during the time of British occupation, on December 30, 1865 and died in London, England on January 18, 1936.  His other well-known works include The Jungle Book and Just So Stories.

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells
       
     
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells

A fantastic tale of man and animal's evolution as well as its disruption by a scientist's interruption. Wells' timeless classic explores the dire consequences of man's intervention and modification of nature's processes.

Herbert George (H.G.) Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Kent, United Kingdom and died on August 13, 1946 in Regent’s Park, London.  Often considered the father of science fiction, H.G. Wells is also well known for his other timeless classics:  The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds and The Invisible Man.

The Importance Of Being Earnest
       
     
The Importance Of Being Earnest

A lighthearted comedy of errors, filled with various motivations and deceptions, where things and people are not who they are supposed to be.  Wilde's popular masterpiece exposes the reader to the depths of Victorian England and its sometimes trivial concerns.

Oscar Final O’Flahertie Willis Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin, Ireland and died on November 30, 1900 in Paris, France.  Wilde is considered to be one of the most gifted playwrights and novelists who has existed.  Plagued by extreme wealth and poverty, Wilde embodied the fantastic attributes of some his most colorful and memorable characters.  Wilde is also known for The Picture of Dorian Gray and Salome.